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Benefits of SMS Alerts in Healthcare Industry

A competitive landscape and rising healthcare costs necessitate healthcare providers to manage costs while maintaining high-quality patient care and support services. Also, with rising cyber-attacks, they need to secure endpoints for mitigating the risk of loss of data.

The use of mobile messaging for effectively managing data and communication is a proven method of reducing costs, improving workflow processes and optimizing patient care services.

Here are the top benefits of deploying SMS technology in healthcare institutions:

1) Booking/Appointment reminder

A 2-way SMS text is an effective way of scheduling and sending reminders to patients of their appointments. This frees up administrative resources and time resulting in cost savings.

2) Diagnostic test reports

Non-confidential, routine health test results can be sent via SMS text to patients reducing patient follow-up calls and commute thereby enhancing operational efficiency

3) Queue system

An SMS alert is useful for informing patients of their queue number when there is limited space available in the healthcare institution or patients are experiencing longer waiting time.

4) 2-Factor Authentication (2FA) Security

A second layer of security via SMS One-Time-Password, 2FA mode can help mitigate cyber-security breaches and allow the doctors and patients to securely access information even from remote locations.

5) Emergency Call

If the patient’s health deteriorates or any code blue situation arises, the nurse can call the call centre who will then send out an SMS alert to the doctors cutting down crucial time to respond.

6) Internal Business Messaging

Use of personal mobile devices to communicate sensitive information can expose the healthcare institution to potential leakage of confidential data sqoope (by TalariaX) is a HIPAA compliant platform through which internal staff can share information securely.

7) Feedback and survey

SMS is a convenient and faster way to gather feedback from patients on the quality of services being offered by the healthcare institution.

TalariaX is a leading industry player in developing and providing enterprise mobile messaging solutions for improving business workflow and productivity. Our range of solutions includes IT Alerts and Notifications, 2-Factor Authentication with SMS OTP, Marketing & Emergency Broadcasting.

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4 Ways To Implement An Automated Workflow For Routine Business Processes

Do you spend a sizeable part of your day executing time-consuming repetitive processes? Implementing workflow automation by streamlining business processes leads to efficiency and eventually cost-savings, thereby improving the bottom-line of a company.

Here are some of the tasks which different departments can (and should) consider automating to enable them to focus on other important activities:

For the business continuity management team:

Deploy an automated call-tree solution as a reliable crisis communication tool to ensure real-time, omnichannel notification outreach to all relevant stakeholders during emergency scenarios

For the operation team:

Reduce no-show rate and minimize revenue losses with automated appointment reminder messages trigger based on information captured in any calendar app

For the IT team:

Countless alerts from various applications and servers and the need for physical presence of staff for monitoring them is time-consuming and pointless. IT managers can deploy a unified notifications management platform which will monitor, centralize and deliver real-time rich alerts in case of crisis.

For the marketing team:

Rich alerts can be auto-triggered whenever an abnormality (i.e. out of the configured threshold range) is detected by a social network monitoring software, thereby respond to any crisis in a timely manner

Overall, business process automation saves time, effort and money by creating active engagements with staff, prospects and clients with interactive 2-way communications that in turn automates relevant workflow across various departments.

sendQuick has a range of solutions to address critical business needs including IT Alerts and Notifications, Business process Automation, Marketing and Emergency Broadcasting, and Remote System Monitoring

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Okada Manila

Okada Manila delights guests by delivering a data-driven customer experience with NetApp

This year, over 7.3 million guests will experience a new level of personalization at Okada Manila as they enjoy leisure in one of the largest casino resorts in the world. NetApp’s hybrid flash storage solutions ensure uninterrupted availability of Okada Manila’s business applications and reliable access to mission critical data.

"NetApp solutions not only simplify data management, but also provide a robust and flexible IT infrastructure that can adapt to changing business needs. With these capabilities, Okada Manila will be able to effectively cope with the growing volume and complexity of data, and continue being a data-driven organization."
Dries Scott
Chief Technology Officer, Okada Manila

Okada Manila realized early on that consistently providing such a top-notch guest experience is only possible with a data-driven approach to running all of its operations. However, this initially posed as a challenge. Since it has a multitude of customer touchpoints across its facilities, Okada Manila needed an IT backbone that allows the right data to be delivered to the right channel at the right time.

With NetApp’s hybrid flash storage solutions, Okada Manila systems will run optimally 24 hours a day, seven days a week as it combines highly reliable hardware, software and sophisticated service analytics to alert IT teams of possible issues that could lead to service outages.

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Enterprise Application Modernization: Key focus areas

Application Modernization

This is the migration of legacy applications to new systems, applications, or platforms, perhaps integrating new functionality to older systems. Organizations modernize applications for many reasons; widening access scenarios, a digitalization requirement, or moving to a new IT infrastructure or API-based architecture. Whatever the reasons, modernized legacy systems must operate in sync with other application systems using, for example, Java or .NET.

Application modernization is a strategic decision factoring in organizational needs, priorities and budgets. Considerations include modernizing the application experience and access method and driving create new workflows around the application through integration and automation.

They may modernize the application code itself with analytical tools to increase programmer productivity, and improve performance. Modernizing dev, test, and production methods and platforms, either for individual applications or as part of a composite application, while leveraging new business models with COBOL investments is another thought.

IT Process Modernization

DevOps and Agile IT processes have improved application development, but the software development lifecycle for host-based application can still be slower than other platforms’ pace, especially when applications must be integrated. This requires application delivery process modernization.

Using DevOps and Agile to improve application development has significantly and positively impacted =the application development process. Nevertheless, the software development lifecycle for host-based applications can still be out of sync with the platforms with which these applications need to integrate.

This has resulted in a de facto hybrid approach to application delivery. Organizations need to extend the advantages, such as delivering applications ‘at the speed of business’, to all applications, whatever their value or platform.

Infrastructure Modernization

For infrastructure modernization to succeed, organizations must prioritize the application host platforms in terms of development, test, and production; whether it is a large host system, a distributed environment, the Cloud, or hybrid.

Organizations doing so can implement fit-for-purpose infrastructure to support traditional and new applications, whether current, Cloud-native, or next-generation applications. Additionally, Infrastructure modernization requires an organization to establish strong security for applications and data.

The IDC white paper Modernization: A Flexible Approach to Digital Transformation is clear; “With end-user platform refreshes running at a cycle of once every 3–5 years, an organization’s delivery platform of choice can be up for renewal at any given time. Large host systems such as mainframes may have a life span of 10–20 years. But oftentimes, the applications they support continue to outlive multiple platform refreshes. [So] there is a constant, cyclical re-evaluation of a business’ core systems — the applications and the platforms upon which these applications are developed, tested, and deployed.”

The Move to the Cloud

Modernizing applications, IT processes, or infrastructure, is a good time to evaluate their potential need to move to the Cloud. This Forrester report on Cloud adoption and modernization opines that, “Moving a core business application to a generic Cloud platform isn’t a pain-free sourcing change.

“Many applications can experience performance degradation, but organizations with existing technology management operations simply cannot start from scratch and rewrite everything for the Cloud. The more intensive the adjustment requirements, the more cost-intensive the move …will be.

“Organizations must devise a strategy for evaluating candidate apps —determining what, if any, changes should be applied to ensure the move is successful and the performance and cost balance is met”. Additionally, Forrester hosted a webinar with Micro Focus on this topic, Exploring Complexities to Cloud Migration & Modernization.

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The Power of Offline Marketing in Retail

GDPR: The Renaissance of SMB Receipt Marketing

Today, because more than half of retail sales are influenced by digital – and GDPR influences data collection – a new trend is emerging: Retailers are turning to offline marketing.

GDPR (or the General Data Protection Regulation) has had implications for foreign small businesses and retailers, and now similar regulations are coming to the United States.

While large retailers may have the funds to dedicate to safeguarding their big data, SMBs tend to have smaller budgets and fewer staff to manage such procedures. How do these stores continue to successfully communicate with customers – and stay protected against regulation?

Receipt Marketing: A Secret Weapon to Boost Customer Engagement

Independent retailers may create email marketing campaigns or implement a basic loyalty program, but there’s another thing they could be doing: receipt marketing.

Apart from customer service at physical stores, what’s the one thing shoppers always take away with them? A receipt, which is an intuitive and significantly underutilized marketing channel!

Customer retention, loyalty and engagement are all built upon developing relationships, being memorable, standing out and creating a connection. What if a cute or funny message on a receipt could do that? What if coupons, discounts, QR codes and thoughtful messages on receipts could build rapport with your audience?

It’s Cheap, Easy, Safe and Humanizing

Because digital marketing doesn’t always produce results for brands with a strict budget, offline marketing that reaches all customers could be a more rational place to invest your customer engagement dollars.

Just think of the possibilities! Your messaging can be timely and feature endearing calls-to-action that brighten your customer’s day. And the best part? This type of offline marketing has no privacy infringements – just enticing offers and a personal touch that makes SMBs feel genuine.

Customer Incentives for Return Business

Receipts can be a great place to highlight special offers to boost future store, restaurant and kiosk traffic.

Offline Meets Mobile: QR Codes

QR codes embedded on receipts, cards and in-store posters mean offline marketing can sync up with mobile offers.

Persuasive Discount Offers and Time-Sensitive Offline Messaging

Receipt marketing is a great way to reach a lot of eyeballs at an extremely low cost. Discounts with time-sensitive offers can create some of the best results and are a part of the most persuasive loyalty campaigns.

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Digital Transformation and Micro Focus

Micro Focus enables modernization and digital transformation through a broad solution portfolio, characterized in this IDC white paper as “a holistic view of the whole application.” This is the idea that the application includes both the code, the access experience, and importantly, security.

“[The] Micro Focus perspective is that customers can approach modernization in [different] ways, incrementally, and with or without the need to change the underlying code — all depending on the level of modernization required as dictated by business requirements and priorities.”

The Micro Focus solution portfolio supports a successful modernization strategy in different ways:

Mainframe and COBOL

Back to IDC; “[The] Micro Focus COBOL and mainframe product portfolio … provide[s] support across the application delivery lifecycle, and while it can … be deployed as a holistic solution, it comprises products designed specifically for the key technical phases involved.”

The technologies in this portfolio include; analyzer technology (Enterprise Analyzer and COBOL Analyzer), development technology (Enterprise Developer and Visual COBOL), flexible mainframe testing technology (Enterprise Test Server), deployment technology (COBOL Server and Enterprise Server), and application delivery management and control technology (ChangeMan ZMF and Enterprise Sync).

Host Connectivity

Micro Focus organizes its Host Connectivity portfolio into three groups of solutions: access, integration, and management and security. These solutions include Reflection, InfoConnect, Rumba+, Extra!, Verastream, Databridge, Reflection for Secure IT, Host Access for the Cloud (formerly ZFE), and Host Access Management and Security (MSS).

To quote IDC again “Micro Focus solutions for accessing host applications have long since moved beyond the origins of ‘terminal emulation.’ It is now about modernizing application access from user experience, security, and data protection perspectives

“The Micro Focus Host Connectivity portfolio … is about modernizing and connecting core, business-critical applications to the rest of the organization, instead of replacing them, to create new value such as through digital transformation.”

In summary

To wrap up all three posts, let’s summarize the advice from Gartner, Forrester, and IDC about these modernization trends based on other organizations’ experiences. In Use Continuous Modernization to Build Digital Platforms from Legacy Applications, Gartner states “application leaders responsible for a strategy to build a digital business platform should exploit and extend the value of [their] legacy applications by removing obstacles, rather than viewing and treating those applications as a problem”. On a similar note, the Forrester report Exploring the Complexities of Cloud Migration and App Modernization opined that to keep pace with technology adoption, organizations must “consider how they manage transfer/move activities. Technology and business leaders must be laser-focused on what they want to achieve and remember to align business systems to the business strategy”.

So there seems to be a clear theme of making more of what an organization has now and aligning it with what they will need in the future.

IDC sum it up in their white paper Modernization: A Flexible Approach to Digital Transformation, acknowledging the “shift from a ‘rip and replace’ approach toward modernization strategies that are aimed at gaining significant business value in the form of agility, new business capabilities, and a reduction in TCO and risk.”

Why this matter:

Assistance on the journey to digital transformation comes in two strands.

There are the analysts who offer guidance on modernization, while the Micro Focus portfolio of mainframe and COBOL solutions provide support across the application delivery lifecycle, while the host connectivity solutions give access to the mainframe, while providing security and data protection.

These solutions align with that guidance to offer organizations a way to modernize applications, IT infrastructure and processes, while maintaining access to legacy applications.

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Millennials’ Eating Habits: How They’re Changing the Food Industry

If there’s one generation that makes headlines, it’s millennials. According to the 2015 U.S. Census, there are 75.4 million millennials living in the country, officially making them the largest generation in the States. If you operate a restaurant, it’s worth paying attention to what millennials do and want – especially when you consider that they spend more dining out than they save for retirement. Here are the top four things millennials are seeking when it comes to dining out – and how these changes are affecting the food industry.

They Want Convenience

The first meal kit service started in 2007 – and now, 12 years later, it’s a booming industry estimated to hit $10 billion in revenue by 2020. Who’s to thank for that? Millennials, of course – they’re considerably more likely to subscribe to these services than non-millennials.

That’s just one example of the importance convenience has to millennials. Other popular (and booming) examples are grocery delivery services, food trucks, heat-and-eat options available at grocery stores, and online ordering (millennials are the most likely to get home delivery from restaurants). In fact, according to the 2017 Food and Health Survey by the International Food Information Council, 55% of millennials say convenience is a top driver when buying food.

They Want Transparency (And Responsibility)

Don’t be mistaken: just because millennials value convenience doesn’t mean they don’t also take healthiness and sustainability seriously. The trend is just the opposite, actually.

First and foremost, millennials are redefining what it means for a food to be considered “healthy” – instead of low-fat being a top priority, they now put natural, organic, locally sourced, and sustainable foods at the top of their list. Did you know that millennials eat 52% more vegetables than baby boomers and 52% of organic consumers are millennials?

This generation also wants to know where their food is made – a whopping 80% of them want to know more about where their food is grown – and they value how it’s made (you may have noticed the terms “locally sourced” and “farm-to-table” popping up on menus in recent years).

They Want Trendiness

Gone are the days of steak and potatoes – instead, unique, customizable items are making a splash with millennials. “Build-your-own” quick service restaurants (like Chipotle) are growing steadily, and for a good reason: 72% of consumers expect customization! Some examples of recent unique trends are food bowls, food mashups/hybrids (hello, cronuts), and avocado toast.

So, are unique meals actually popular with millennials, or do they just make headlines? The former is true: 40% of millennials report they like to order different things every time they eat in the same restaurant, and they don’t shy away from vegan and cultural cuisines. They’re also described as open-minded and curious. Besides adopting a creative menu, it’s a good idea to also create a unique, modern vibe in your restaurant – from your light fixtures to your point of sale.

Avocado toast, a trendy meal popular among millennials. Source: pexels.com

They Want an Experience

If you have a social media account, you know that photos from users experiencing a satisfying meal are popular. In fact, 75% of millennials report they value the experience of eating food more than the nourishment. And social media is a huge part of the dining experience: 41% of millennials log in to Facebook every day, 29% use Instagram regularly, and 25% use Snapchat on a daily basis. To top it off, 20% of millennials say that they receive food news from peers on Facebook.

To help make your restaurant “Instagram-worthy,” consider adopting a modern and aesthetically pleasing menu design, ambiance, and décor – and don’t forget to create social media accounts for your restaurant if you haven’t already!

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Block vs Object Storage

What is Block Storage?

Block storage is a type of data storage that involves storing data in consistently-sized, easily accessible blocks.

Block storage definition

Ideal for data that must frequently be accessed and edited, block storage refers to a form of data storage wherein files are stored in even blocks. The most common type of data storage, block storage is usually used in SAN environments.

Why block storage?

Although block storage isn’t as scalable as object storage, it is the solution for those looking to store data they need to access and change often. With block storage, individual pieces of data can be edited without compromising the entire block of data. Block storage is more expensive and complex, but block data can be accessed without compromising operating system performance.

HPE block storage products and services

HPE solutions will help you consolidate, simplify and increase uptime. And help you address user file data headaches efficiently, effortlessly and without compromises.

Featured Products

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File Persona

HPE 3PAR StoreServ with HPE 3PAR File Persona is the industry’s most efficient storage engineered for the true convergence of block, file, and object access. It is easier to provision and easier to monitor in reduced data centre space.

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File Controller

Unlike typical gateways, HPE 3PAR file services provided by the HPE 3PAR StoreServ File Controller deliver advanced integrated capabilities, including repurposing capacity easily and dynamically between file shares and block volumes.

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HPE 3PAR StoreServ

Tier 1 all-flash data storage array that scales from midsize to the largest enterprises and service providers.

What is Object Storage?

Object storage is a type of data storage that involves storing data as objects with associated metadata and
unique identifiers.

Object storage definition

Ideal for data that must be accessed, but not edited, object storage refers to a form of data storage wherein files are stored as objects with associated metadata and unique identifiers that enable them to be accessed on a network. Common types of data stored as blocks include songs, photos, and video clips.

Why object storage?

Object storage is currently the best solution for storing mass amounts of data. It is virtually endlessly scalable, and, in a world where the rate of data being generated is increasing exponentially, this is good news for storing certain types of data. However, it is also important to remember that the data cannot be edited without the entire object being rewritten. Data that is often stored as objects includes songs, images, and video clips.

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5 Ways to Incorporate the Internet of Things into Your Store

The Internet of Things (IoT) is no longer just a buzzword – it’s a living, breathing technology that’s making a splash in retail stores around the world. By 2020, it’s estimated that there will be over 30 billion IoT devices!

IoT offers great benefits to the retail industry. In fact, 77% of retailers believe it improves the customer experience, 89% report that it provides increased insights into customer preferences, and 77% say that it helps them work with partners to deliver quality products and services.

How will IoT devices impact stores’ bottom lines? By reducing inventory error, optimizing supply chain management, and decreasing labor costs, it’s estimated that the potential economic impact of IoT in retail environments will range from $410 billion to $1.2 trillion per year by 2025!

So, how can you take advantage of IoT? Below are five ways to incorporate this new wave into your store.

  1. Personalized Discounts

Did you know that nearly half of consumers are willing to share their personal data in exchange for exclusive benefits? One of the biggest benefits shoppers are looking to receive is personalized promotions. By installing connected sensors around your store, you can send loyalty discounts to customers when they stand near certain products.

You can also use IoT to track what items a customer has looked at online, and then give them a personalized discount on that specific item when they visit your physical store. Another great way to use customer data to promote sales is through Star Micronics PromoPRNT, a value-add program that works with your existing receipt printer to deliver promotions directly on printed receipts.

2. Smart Shelves

Soon retail shelves as we know it will be completely different, thanks to smart shelves. This next-generation shelving includes electronic labels, personalized advertisements, RFID technology, and IoT sensors. One popular use case for smart shelves is supermarkets – grocery retailers are expected to increasingly use smart shelves to quickly update product prices, as well as display promotions, nutritional data, coupons, videos, and more.

Smart shelves can also interact with apps on a customer’s phone and do things like show shoppers where to find all the items on their grocery list, and enable each item to be scanned by a robotic checkout.

Smart Shelving in a Kroger Store. (Source: Microsoft News)

3. Beacons

Beacons – or small wireless sensors that can be attached virtually anywhere – work with customers’ smartphones to collect locational and contextual data (if they have downloaded your app). These sensors can be used to track shoppers when they’re in your store and send them personalized content, coupons, and more. In the age of online shopping, this level of exclusive, tailored content is just what stores need to keep drawing customers into their brick and mortar establishment.

The truth of beacon success is in the numbers: approximately 75% of shoppers provided with beacon content say it increased their chances of making a purchase, and over 60% said they’re willing to spend more money on holiday shopping at brick-and-mortar stores if they’re sent special offers.

4. Digital Signage

Any way you cut it, digital signage is huge in both helping boost a store’s attractiveness, as well as pushing data-driven content to strategically targeted customers. Digital signage can truly unify your IoT efforts by collecting customer data from beacons, sensors, and smart devices, and then display commercials, product information, and personalized promotions – at just the right time.

Curious how big of a market digital signage is? Hint: huge. The global market value for digital signage is expecting to grow to $32.84 billion by 2023! If you’re looking to make the most of your digital signage, consider using a tool such as Sales Receipt Viewer & Analytics. The tool provides web-based receipt data and allows you to download digital receipts, analyze sales trends, discover sales anomalies, and more.

An Example of Digital Signage. (Source: Sophatar)

5. Supply Chain Management

Simply put, IoT is redefining supply chain management across the globe. Here are three examples:

  • Asset Tracking: RFID and GPS sensors can track products from factory to store. This not only makes asset tracking much easier, but it can also provide important information such as what temperature a product was kept at and how long it took to sell.
  • Inventory: Using IoT sensors, retailers can instantly check inventory levels and proactively receive alerts when a product’s inventory is low. The sensors are also very helpful in tracking purchasing trends, making inventory management a more efficient process.
  • Maintenance: IoT sensors can also be placed on manufacturing equipment to keep on top of scheduled maintenance, preventing expensive and untimely break-downs.
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Understanding Key Management Policy – Part 2

In the first part of this two-part series on Key Management, we saw how an increasing number of organizations are encrypting their sensitive data to mitigate cybersecurity risks. As covered earlier, with cybercriminals getting more sophisticated, merely encrypting data is not sufficient.

With data encryption, the risk is transferred from the data to the encryption keys and to ensure optimal data protection, organizations should make sure that their encryption keys are efficiently managed and safeguarded at each stage of their lifecycle.

In this part, we will cover the various benefits of centralizing your key management and guide you on how to adopt key management for your organization.

Centralized Key Management

When it comes to securely storing the encryption keys, three pertinent questions should be addressed:

1. Where are the keys stored – in third-party applications, in the cloud (private, public or hybrid?), in a heterogeneous environment that supports multiple databases?

2. Are the keys protected with strong access management mechanisms that prevent unauthorised access?

3. Is your approach to key security compliant with the statutory mandates of the regulatory bodies?

As more and more data gets encrypted, the dependence on encryption keys increases and safeguarding all the keys (throughout their entire lifecycle) becomes challenging. The task becomes more daunting in an environment where organizations use diverse vendor systems that generate their own keys.

Further, as encryption keys undergo a lot of changes throughout their lifecycle – like creation, key versioning, distribution, rotation, storage, archival, backup, and ultimately destruction, managing the keys at each juncture of their lifecycle becomes critical.

This is where centralized key management comes handy. With the inherent ability to safely store and manage all the encryption keys centrally in a secure and efficient manner, organizations can uniformly view, control, and administer the encryption keys for all their sensitive data – whether it resides in the cloud, in storage, in databases, or virtually anywhere else.

Leading Key Management Solutions (KMSs) can seamlessly manage keys across heterogeneous encryption platforms and offer extensive support for the Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP) standard, as well as for proprietary interfaces, managing a disparate set of encryption keys becomes easier.

Apart from secure storage and management, another important aspect of centralized key management is key governance. Merely storing and managing the keys is not sufficient but ensuring foolproof access management is equally important. Centralized key management enables proper key governance – even when the data and people move from department to department within the organization.

Requisites for Effective Centralized Key Management

Now that we understand why organizations should adopt centralized key management to ensure optimal data protection, let’s look at the three important requisites for centralized key management to work smoothly:

1. Key Management Server

At the heart of any good Key Management Solution is a FIPS 140-2, Level 3-certified intrusion-resistant, tamper-proof hardware server (also known as a Hardware Security Module or HSM) that plays the important role of creating, storing, retrieving, rotating, archiving and deleting the encryption keys.

This server also facilitates seamless communication with all other applications (both internal as well as external) through native encryption using the Key Management Interoperability Protocol (KMIP).

Below are three important points that organizations should consider while selecting a key management server:

(1) Adherence to Regulatory Compliances

The server must comply with federal security requirements that mandate the destruction of all the stored encryption keys upon detection of a forced entry.

(2) Role Management

The server should have in-built role management features that provide separation of duties between various user roles with handy tools to quickly assign/delete roles. As more and more data gets encrypted leading to an increasing dependence on encryption keys, role management becomes a crucial feature for any organization.

(3) Interoperability

The server should be able to coherently interoperate with other business applications by providing access to its user interface through APIs, web services and encryption connectors.

As a best practice, organizations should:

(a) Store all encryption keys (and not just the Root of Trust Master Key) in the hardware server.

(b) Ensure that the autorotation and versioning of keys take place as per a pre-defined schedule without any downtime during the key rotation process, and

(c) Ensure that the whitelisting of the IP address happens within the secure hardware server itself.

2. Key Management Policies

As seen in our previous post, a key management policy (KMP) is a pre-defined set of rules that cover the goals, responsibilities, and overall requirements for securing and managing an organization’s encryption keys.

While a key management server can centrally manage all the encryption keys and enforce set policies, it cannot create a KMP on its own. The onus of chalking out a comprehensive KMP lies with the organization’s Cybersecurity & IT Heads, like the Chief Information Security Officer (CISO), Chief Risk Officer (CRO), etc. who are responsible for ensuring the adoption of KMPs for data protection. ‘Unambiguity’ is one of the most important pillars of a good KMP that makes sure that there are no misinterpretations whatsoever while accessing the encryption keys. For example, a KMP can unequivocally state that the employees of one business unit or department cannot access the encryption keys of another unit, or that access to the keys can be granted only through the corporate LAN.

3. Key Management Processes

Key management processes are a host of diverse processes like inputs, activities, and outputs that are pivotal to centralized key management.

These processes help users in using their organization’s KMP and can be automated or implemented manually. For example, depending on the sensitivity of the data to be accessed, the Key Management Process may instruct users to either connect through a VPN or through the corporate LAN.

3. Key Management Processes

As the global leader in enterprise key management, Gemalto’s SafeNet KeySecure is widely adopted by organizations across the globe to centralize manage their encryption keys.

Available as a hardware appliance or virtual security appliance, SafeNet KeySecure is a plug-and-play, secure centralized key management platform that can be quickly deployed in physical, virtualized infrastructure and public cloud environments.

Holistically supporting data encryption and key management of a diverse set of databases like Oracle, IBM DB2, Microsoft SQL, Mongo DB, etc., SafeNet KeySecure also seamlessly supports the generation, storage and exporting of keys in a Bring-Your-Own-Key (BYOK) environment from cloud players like Microsoft Azure, Amazon Web Services, etc.

Below is a quick snapshot of the diverse integrations ecosystem that Gemalto’s SafeNet KeySecure supports:

For organizations that have already invested in HSM devices, Gemalto offers a cost-friendly Virtual Key Management Solution – SafeNet Virtual KeySecure that centralizes all cryptographic processing and provides scalable key management at remote facilities or cloud infrastructures such as VMware or AWS Marketplace.

To Sum It Up

With rising incidents of cyber attacks and data breaches, neither front line defense mechanisms suffice, nor does mere data encryption. To safeguard sensitive data, organizations should not only secure their encryption keys from unauthorized access, but also efficiently manage them centrally through a state-of-the-art, highly scalable key management solution. Learn more about Enterprise Key Management and how it can help your organization efficiently manage your encryption keys.